GupShup Study
 
  
MICROECONOMICS - Principles and Analysis by Frank A. Cowell pdf eBook download free
Rajan Sharma

MICROECONOMICS - Principles and Analysis by Frank A. Cowell pdf eBook download free

Rajan Sharma | 27-Jun-2016 |
Introduction , The Firm , The Firm and the Market , The Consumer , The Consumer and the Market , A Simple Economy , General Equilibrium , Uncertainty and Risk , Welfare , Strategic Behaviour , Information , Design , Government and the Individual ,

Hi friends, here Rajan Sharma uploaded notes for MICROECONOMICS with title MICROECONOMICS - Principles and Analysis by Frank A. Cowell pdf eBook download free. You can download this lecture notes, ebook by clicking on the below file name or icon.

MICROECONOMICS Topics

 

1 Introduction 1
1.1 The rôle of microeconomic principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Microeconomic models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2.1 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2.2 The economic actors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2.3 Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2.4 The economic environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2.5 Assumptions and axioms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2.6 “Testing”a model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 Equilibrium analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3.1 Equilibrium and economic context . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3.2 The comparative statics method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3.3 Dynamics and stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4 Background to this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4.1 Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4.2 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.5 Using the book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5.1 A route map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5.2 Some tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2 The Firm 9
2.1 Basic setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.1.1 The …rm: basic ingredients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.1.2 Properties of the production function . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.2 The optimisation problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.2.1 Optimisation stage 1: cost minimisation . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.2.2 The cost function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
iii
iv CONTENTS
2.2.3 Optimisation stage 2: choosing output . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.2.4 Assembling the solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.3 The …rm as a “black box” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.3.1 Demand and supply functions of the …rm . . . . . . . . . 29
2.3.2 Comparative statics: the general case . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.4 The short run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.5 The multiproduct …rm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.6 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.7 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3 The Firm and the Market 49
3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.2 The market supply curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.3 Large numbers and the supply curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
3.4 Interaction amongst …rms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.5 The size of the industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3.6 Price-setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
3.6.1 Simple monopoly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
3.6.2 Discriminating monopolist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.6.3 Entry fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
3.7 Product variety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3.8 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
3.9 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
3.10 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
4 The Consumer 69
4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
4.2 The consumer’s environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.3 Revealed preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.4 Preferences: axiomatic approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.5 Consumer optimisation: …xed income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.5.1 Cost-minimisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4.5.2 Utility-maximisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
4.6 Welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.6.1 An application: price indices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.7 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
4.8 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
4.9 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
5 The Consumer and the Market 99
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
5.2 The market and incomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
5.3 Supply by households . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
5.3.1 Labour supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
5.3.2 Savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
CONTENTS v
5.4 Household production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
5.5 Aggregation over goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
5.6 Aggregation of consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
5.7 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
5.8 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
5.9 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
6 A Simple Economy 121
6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
6.2 Another look at production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.2.1 Processes and net outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.2.2 The technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
6.2.3 The production function again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
6.2.4 Externalities and aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
6.3 The Robinson Crusoe economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
6.4 Decentralisation and trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
6.5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
6.6 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
6.7 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
7 General Equilibrium 143
7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
7.2 A more interesting economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
7.2.1 Allocations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
7.2.2 Incomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.2.3 An illustration: the exchange economy . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.3 The logic of price-taking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
7.3.1 The core of the exchange economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
7.3.2 Competitive equilibrium and the core: small economy . . 152
7.3.3 Competitive equilibrium and the core: large economy . . 152
7.4 The excess-demand approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.4.1 Properties of the excess demand function . . . . . . . . . 157
7.4.2 Existence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
7.4.3 Uniqueness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
7.4.4 Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
7.5 The rôle of prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
7.5.1 The equilibrium allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
7.5.2 Decentralisation again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
7.6 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
7.7 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
7.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
vi CONTENTS
8 Uncertainty and Risk 177
8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
8.2 Consumption and uncertainty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
8.2.1 The nature of choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
8.2.2 State-space diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.3 A model of preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
8.3.1 Key axioms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
8.3.2 Von-Neumann-Morgenstern utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
8.3.3 The “felicity”function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
8.4 Risk aversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
8.4.1 Risk premium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
8.4.2 Indices of risk aversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
8.4.3 Special cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
8.5 Lotteries and preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
8.5.1 The probability space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
8.5.2 Axiomatic approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
8.6 Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
8.6.1 Contingent goods: competitive equilibrium . . . . . . . . 203
8.6.2 Financial assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
8.7 Individual optimisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
8.7.1 The attainable set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
8.7.2 Components of the optimum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
8.7.3 The portfolio problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
8.7.4 Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
8.8 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
8.9 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
8.10 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
9 Welfare 227
9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
9.2 The constitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
9.3 Principles for social judgments: e¢ ciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
9.3.1 Private goods and the market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
9.3.2 Departures from e¢ ciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
9.3.3 Externalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
9.3.4 Public goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
9.3.5 Uncertainty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
9.3.6 Extending the e¢ ciency idea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
9.4 Principles for social judgments: equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
9.4.1 Fairness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
9.4.2 Concern for inequality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
9.5 The social-welfare function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
9.5.1 Welfare, national income and expenditure . . . . . . . . . 259
9.5.2 Inequality and welfare loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
9.6 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
9.7 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
CONTENTS vii
9.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
10 Strategic Behaviour 271
10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
10.2 Games –basic concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
10.2.1 Players, rules and payo¤s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
10.2.2 Information and Beliefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
10.2.3 Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
10.2.4 Representing a game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
10.3 Equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
10.3.1 Multiple equilibria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
10.3.2 E¢ ciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
10.3.3 Existence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
10.4 Application: duopoly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
10.4.1 Competition in quantities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
10.4.2 Competition in prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
10.5 Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
10.5.1 Games and subgames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
10.5.2 Equilibrium: more on concept and method . . . . . . . . 297
10.5.3 Repeated interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
10.6 Application: market structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
10.6.1 Market leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
10.6.2 Market entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
10.6.3 Another look at duopoly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
10.7 Uncertainty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
10.7.1 A basic model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
10.7.2 An application: entry again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
10.7.3 Mixed strategies again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
10.7.4 A “dynamic”approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
10.8 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
10.9 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
10.10Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
11 Information 327
11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
11.2 Hidden characteristics: adverse selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
11.2.1 Information and monopoly power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
11.2.2 One customer type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
11.2.3 Multiple types: Full information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
11.2.4 Imperfect information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
11.2.5 Adverse selection: Competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
11.2.6 Application: Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
11.3 Hidden characteristics: Signalling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
11.3.1 Costly signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
11.3.2 Costless signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
11.4 Hidden actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
viii CONTENTS
11.4.1 The issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
11.4.2 Outline of the problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
11.4.3 A simpli…ed model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
11.4.4 Principal-and-Agent: a richer model . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
11.5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
11.6 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
11.7 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
12 Design 381
12.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
12.2 Social choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382
12.3 Markets and manipulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
12.3.1 Markets: another look . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
12.3.2 Simple trading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
12.3.3 Manipulation: power and misrepresentation . . . . . . . . 387
12.3.4 A design issue? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
12.4 Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
12.4.1 Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390
12.4.2 Direct mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
12.4.3 The revelation principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392
12.5 The design problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
12.6 Design: applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395
12.6.1 Auctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395
12.6.2 A public project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403
12.6.3 Contracting again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
12.6.4 Taxation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
12.7 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422
12.8 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424
12.9 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424
13 Government and the Individual 431
13.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
13.2 Market failure? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
13.3 Nonconvexities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433
13.3.1 Large numbers and convexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435
13.3.2 Interactions and convexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435
13.3.3 The infrastructure problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
13.3.4 Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
13.4 Externalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442
13.4.1 Production externalities: the e¢ ciency problem . . . . . . 443
13.4.2 Corrective taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
13.4.3 Production externalities: Private solutions . . . . . . . . . 444
13.4.4 Consumption externalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
13.4.5 Externalities: assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448
13.5 Public consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448
13.5.1 Nonrivalness and e¢ ciency conditions . . . . . . . . . . . 449
CONTENTS ix
13.5.2 Club goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449
13.6 Public goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451
13.6.1 The issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451
13.6.2 Voluntary provision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
13.6.3 Personalised prices? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454
13.6.4 Public goods: market failure and the design problem . . . 457
13.6.5 Public goods: alternative mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . 458
13.7 Optimal allocations? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460
13.7.1 Optimum with lump-sum transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
13.7.2 Second-best approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
13.8 Conclusion: Economic Prescriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
13.9 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
13.10Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Bibliography 473
A Mathematics Background 485
A.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 485
A.2 Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486
A.2.1 Sets in Rn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486
A.3 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487
A.3.1 Linear and a¢ ne functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487
A.3.2 Continuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488
A.3.3 Homogeneous functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
A.3.4 Homothetic functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491
A.4 Di¤erentiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
A.4.1 Function of one variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
A.4.2 Function of several variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493
A.4.3 Function-of-a-Function Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493
A.4.4 The Jacobian derivative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494
A.4.5 The Taylor expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494
A.4.6 Elasticities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494
A.5 Mappings and systems of equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
A.5.1 Fixed-point results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
A.5.2 Implicit functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497
A.6 Convexity and Concavity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499
A.6.1 Convex sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499
A.6.2 Hyperplanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
A.6.3 Separation results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
A.6.4 Convex and concave functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503
A.6.5 quasiconcave functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505
A.6.6 The Hessian property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507
A.7 Maximisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507
A.7.1 The basic technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508
A.7.2 Constrained maximisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510
A.7.3 More on constrained maximisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
x CONTENTS
A.7.4 Envelope theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514
A.7.5 A point on notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
A.8 Probability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
A.8.1 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516
A.8.2 Bayes’rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518
A.8.3 Probability distributions: examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518
A.9 Reading notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519
B Answers to Footnote Questions 521
B.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
B.2 The …rm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
B.3 The …rm and the market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528
B.4 The consumer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529
B.5 The consumer and the market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
B.6 A simple economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539
B.7 General equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542
B.8 Uncertainty and risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548
B.9 Welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556
B.10 Strategic behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 561
B.11 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570
B.12 Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583
B.13 Government and individual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
C Selected Proofs 607
C.1 The …rm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607
C.1.1 Marginal cost and the Lagrange multiplier . . . . . . . . . 607
C.1.2 Properties of the cost function (Theorem 2.2) . . . . . . . 608
C.1.3 Firm’s demand and supply functions (Theorem 2.4) . . . 611
C.1.4 Firm’s demand and supply functions (continued) . . . . . 612
C.1.5 Properties of pro…t function (Theorem 2.7) . . . . . . . . 613
C.2 The consumer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614
C.2.1 The representation theorem (Theorem 4.1) . . . . . . . . 614
C.2.2 Existence of ordinary demand functions (Theorem 4.5) . . 615
C.2.3 Quasiconvexity of the indirect utility function . . . . . . . 615
C.3 The consumer and the market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616
C.3.1 Composite commodity (Theorem 5.1): . . . . . . . . . . . 616
C.3.2 The representative consumer (Theorem 5.2): . . . . . . . 616
C.4 A simple economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617
C.4.1 Decentralisation (Theorem 6.2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617
C.5 General equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617
C.5.1 Competitive equilibrium and the core (Theorem 7.1) . . . 617
C.5.2 Existence of competitive equilibrium (Theorem 7.4) . . . 618
C.5.3 Uniqueness of competitive equilibrium (Theorem 7.5) . . 619
C.5.4 Valuation in general equilibrium (Theorem 7.6) . . . . . . 619
C.6 Uncertainty and risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620
C.6.1 Risk-taking and wealth (Theorem 8.7) . . . . . . . . . . . 620
CONTENTS xi
C.7 Welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620
C.7.1 Arrow’s theorem (Theorem 9.1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620
C.7.2 Black’s theorem (Theorem 9.2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 622
C.7.3 The support theorem (Theorem 9.5) . . . . . . . . . . . . 623
C.7.4 Potential superiority (Theorem 9.10) . . . . . . . . . . . . 625
C.8 Strategic behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626
C.8.1 Nash equilibrium in pure strategies with in…nite strategy
sets (Theorem 10.2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626
C.8.2 Existence of Nash equilibrium (Theorem 10.1) . . . . . . 627
C.8.3 The Folk theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627
C.9 Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 628
C.9.1 Revenue equivalence (Theorem 12.6) . . . . . . . . . . . . 628
C.9.2 The Clark-Groves mechanism (Theorem 12.7) . . . . . . 630

 

Download free full pdf eBook of MICROECONOMICS - Principles and Analysis by Frank A. Cowell

    Attachment Lists

    If download doesn't start in application like IDM then press Alt + click on download button to start download
  • MicroEconomics- Principles and Analysis.pdf (Size: 3945.57KB) Dowland
Share With Friends :  

No any Comment yet!

Total View : 327